COURTNEY HARTMAN AND jacob kotecki

Background information
Children of the black race were denied enrollment of public schools that held the white race under laws requiring or permitting segregation according to the races. This case disobeyed the law against racial segregation in schools and other public facilities. On December 9-11, 1952, Oliver Brown and the NAACP got together and argued to the Board of Education of Topeka that this was unlawful. The schools portrayed discrimination and stereotype against people with unique ethnicity. This act is unconstitutional because racial discrimination is prohibited by the “Equal Protection Clause” in the 14th Amendment.
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Constitutional Significance
This case abuses the 14th amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which guarantees all citizens equal protection of the laws. In 1954, the United States Supreme Court’s decision, influenced by Oliver L. Brown, to pass an amendment which grants people of a unique race, religion or ethnicity equal rights as a U.S. citizen.


Decision/ precedent:
Because of the Brown v. Board of Education case, the Supreme Court came to the conclusion that racial discrimination is prohibited in any way shape or form. This includes schools, clubs, neighborhoods and committees. Racial discrimination is absolutely unacceptable in all states and will not be tolerated.
Important facts/ terms
· Discrimination: treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class,or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit
· Stereotype: simplified and standardized conception or image invested with special meaning and held in common by members of a group
· Segregation is now constitutionally illegal forbidden in any state
· 14th Amendment/ Equal Protection Clause: “no state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; now deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of laws.”

WORK CITED
"BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION OF TOPEKA 344 U.S. 1." Fedworld.gov. NTIS, 24 Feb. 2010. Web. 16 Apr. 2008. http://supcourt.ntis.gov/get_case.html?casename=Case%20Name:%20BROWN%20V.%20BOARD%20OF%20EDUCATION%20OF%20TOPEKA%20344%20U.S.%201%20&searchstring=mode=casename&cn_words1=.Goldman, Jerry . "Brown v. Board of Education (II)." The Oyez Project. N.p., 2008. Web. 24 Feb. 2010. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1954/1954_1>.
"Brown v. Board of Education About the Case." Brown v. Board of Education. Brown Foundation for Educational Equity, 11 Apr. 2004. Web. 24 Feb. 2010. <http://brownvboard.org/summary/>."BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION OF TOPEKA 344 U.S. 1." Fedworld.gov. NTIS, 24 Feb. 2010. Web. 16 Apr. 2008. http://supcourt.ntis.gov/get_case.html?casename=Case%20Name:%20BROWN%20V.%20BOARD%20OF%20EDUCATION%20OF%20TOPEKA%20344%20U.S.%201%20&searchstring=mode=casename&cn_words1=.
Goldman, Jerry . "Brown v. Board of Education (II)." The Oyez Project. N.p., 2008. Web. 24 Feb. 2010. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1954/1954_1."Brown v. Board of Education About the Case." Brown v. Board of Education. Brown Foundation for Educational Equity, 11 Apr. 2004. Web. 24 Feb. 2010. <http://brownvboard.org/summary/>.